2013/08/31

Karmapa to bless, preach to disaster-hit Himachal residents( News Track India )

Himachal Pradesh,Crime/Disaster/Accident,Religion, Sat, 31 Aug 2013



Rekong Peo (Himachal Pradesh), Aug 31 (IANS) The 17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, reached here Saturday to bless and preach to people in Kinnaur district, which was ravaged by flash floods in June.
The Karmapa is the third most important Tibetan religious head after the Dalai Lama and the Panchen Lama.
Incessant rain in the region June 16 triggered massive landslides that blocked many roads in Kinnaur. Maximum damage was reported from the district where 23 people died, hundreds were displaced and more than 300 houses damaged.
"The Karmapa will meet, bless and preach people of Kinnaur region from Sunday. He will lend a support to them, majority of whom are Buddhists," Kunzang Chungyalpa, director in the Karmapa's office of administration, told IANS.
With Tibet along its eastern border, Kinnaur is strongly influenced by Tibetan Buddhist culture, traditions, customs and language.
The locals, known as Kinnauri, have a deep historical connection to Tibetan Buddhism with thousand-year-old monasteries dotting the region.
She said the visit was finalised at the request of local Buddhist communities. "His first visit to Kinnaur comes after three years of requests from devotees, initiated by Lochen Rinpoche."
Travelling as a state guest, the Karmapa was accorded a grand welcome on his arrival.
"He is scheduled to give two days of teachings at Rekong Peo. On Monday afternoon, he will bestow a long-life empowerment for those gathered," a Karmapa's aide said.
With this visit, the Gyalwang Karmapa retraces some of the steps of his predecessor, the 16th Gyalwang Karmapa who visited the region while on pilgrimage to Mt. Kailash in 1948, says a post on the Buddhist monk's official website.
"Spiritual support helps people heal from crises and it is the Karmapa's earnest hope that he will be able to contribute in some measure," said Chungyalpa.
The 28-year-old Karmapa resides in a monastery on the outskirts of Dharamsala where the Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama's government-in-exile is based.
The Karmapa, who fled Tibet and sought refuge in India in January 2000, is the spiritual head of the Karma Kagyu school, one of the four sects of Buddhism.

Gyalwang Karmapa Arrives in Kinnaur for Weeklong Tour



31 August 2013 – Kinnaur, Himachal Pradesh
Leaving Gyuto Monastery in Dharamsala around 8.45am on the morning of 30 August, the Gyalwang Karmapa set off on the long road journey to Kinnaur. Local Tibetan communities came out to greet him as his motorcade wound its way through several settlements en route.
Passing through the Tashi Jong Tibetan settlement in the morning, hundreds of monks, nuns and laypeople lined the road bearing traditional scarves and incense, eager to catch a glimpse of the spiritual leader and escort him on his way. Similar scenes were repeated as he later passed through the Tibetan settlements at Bir and Suja, while the smaller Tibetan community at Mandi also came out to receive him.
After pausing for lunch in Mandi the Gyalwang Karmapa resumed the long and winding journey through the mountains, finally reaching Rampur close to midnight. There he was hosted as a State Guest at the Circuit House of Rampur, which is reserved for visiting government officials and dignitaries.
The following day on 31 August the Gyalwang Karmapa continued his journey, arriving at the border town of Chaura in the late afternoon. There he was officially greeted and welcomed with a traditional Kinnauri ceremony. Local Parliament Members and officials, as well as Choegon Rinpoche, Lochen Rinpoche, Superintendent of Police and many devotees gathered to warmly welcome him, offering displays of traditional Kinnauri songs, costumes, and music.
Later as he resumed his journey many local devotees once again spontaneously lined the roads, eagerly waiting to welcome the Gyalwang Karmapa to their home. Many of the roads the Gyalwang Karmapa passed still bore signs of the heavy flooding that struck the Kinnaur region in June. During the worst of the flash flooding 23 people lost their lives while hundreds more were displaced.
The Gyalwang Karmapa’s tour of the region also aims to offer spiritual support and encouragement to those recovering from the disaster, the majority of whom are Buddhist. He is scheduled give teachings on 1–2 September at Rekong Peo.

2013/08/29

Gyalwang Karmapa Departs For Tour Of Kinnaur And To Attend International Buddhist Conference In Delhi




29 August 2013 – Gyuto Monastery
On 30 August the Gyalwang Karmapa departs for a weeklong tour of the Kinnaur region at the request of local Buddhist communities. His first visit to Kinnaur comes after 3 years of requests from devotees, initiated by Lochen Rinpoche.
Travelling as a State Guest of the Himachal Pradesh Government, the Gyalwang Karmapa will be honored with a grand welcome ceremony on his arrival at Chaura which is the border of the Kinnaur region.
During his time in Kinnaur he is scheduled to give two days of teachings to devotees at Rekong Peo, including Mahamudra teachings on 1 September, and Phowa teachings on 2 September. In the afternoon of 2 September he will bestow a long-life empowerment for those gathered.
With Tibet along its eastern border, the Indian region of Kinnaur is strongly influenced by Tibetan Buddhist culture, traditions, customs, and language. The Kinnauri people have a deep historical connection to Tibetan Buddhism, and several monasteries over a thousand years old are found in the region. With this visit to Kinnaur the Gyalwang Karmapa retraces some of the steps of his predecessor the 16th Gyalwang Karmapa, who also visited the region while on pilgrimage to Mt Kailash in 1948.
After paying visits to several different monasteries and temples in Kinnaur, on his return trip the Gyalwang Karmapa will also stop at Lhamo to visit the nunnery of Lochen Rinpoche, and at Solan to visit the Bon Monastery.
On 6 September the Gyalwang Karmapa will then travel to Delhi where he will attend the 1st Founding Members’ Conclave of the International Buddhist Confederation, organized by the Ashoka Mission. There he will join Buddhist leaders and representatives of Buddhist sanghas from throughout the world in the historic first meeting of a new global Buddhist umbrella body, the International Buddhist Confederation.
During the 4-day conference the Gyalwang Karmapa has been invited to chair a session on “Changing Times: Buddhism in the 21st Century”, as well as to give a talk on the theme of Buddhist responses to the environment.
He returns to Dharamsala around 14 September.

2013/08/28

Tibetans in exile have a great responsibility: 17th Karmapa (TPI)


Wednesday, 28 August 2013 11:51 Yeshe Choesang, The Tibet Post International




Dharamshala: - A meeting in Dharamshala, India, with a large group of foreign-born Tibetan children who were on a Summer Camp Program, the Gyalwang Karmapa urged them to remember the difficulties faced by Tibetans living in Tibet.
The group of about 60 students included young Tibetans born in Switzerland, Canada, the United States, Ireland and France, who had travelled to India in order to learn about and experience more of their Tibetan cultural roots.
On Saturday, August 3, the group had the opportunity to meet and be blessed by the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Rinpoche .
"There are a lot of difficulties that the Tibetans who live in Tibet face, and the responsibility to remove or eliminate those difficulties falls upon all of us who live in foreign countries," the Gyalwang Karmapa told the young students. "It's a great responsibility that we have."
"For all of the Tibetans who live in free countries, who are scattered all over the world, for all of you it is your own individual responsibility. And this is something that you all have to know and understand for yourselves, before anyone else really tells you."
The Gyalwang Karmapa particularly encouraged the young students to learn the Tibetan language and to learn about Tibetan culture and traditions, advising them that this would be very beneficial.
"Actually you are all from a very different environment, a very different place, living in the midst of other cultures, so to be able to learn Tibetan, to speak Tibetan, and to learn about Tibetan culture and traditions is from one way of looking a very difficult thing to do. It can put a lot of pressure on you. But I hope that all of you can take this pressure and transform it into courage."
Finally the Gyalwang Karmapa thanked the parents of the students who had sent their foreign-born Tibetan children to India in order to deepen their cultural roots.
"For all of you parents who have taken the interest in Tibetan culture, and who have decided to send your children who are Tibetans to India in order to learn a little bit more about the situation and the culture in Tibet, and to learn the Tibetan language and also about Tibetan culture and traditions – it is very good. It's something that creates a strong impression and so this is a wonderful thing to do. I'd like to thank you all very much for it."

2013/08/25

Two Arms Mahakara drawn by His Holiness the 17th Karmapa














Interview with His Holiness Karmapa - Karmapa Youth 2013


8/25/2013

English translation is included



His Holiness recently answered three questions that were asked by Karmapa Youth Community:

1) Could this generation become overly dependent on digital media in terms of Buddhist practice? Is it sufficient to receive direct instructions or empowerments from a lama over the internet?
2) Sometimes we can feel disconnected from Buddhism or from our Dharma teachers. What sort of practice should be done in order to bring about a sense of reconnection?
3) What does it mean to take refuge?


2013/08/24

Announcing the Ārya Kshema Winter Dharma Gathering for Kagyu Nuns



This year following the Kagyu Monlam there will be the First Annual Ārya Kshema Winter Dharma Gathering for Kagyu Nuns from January 20 to February 2, 2014. Arising out of His Holiness the Gyalwang Karmapa’s desire to improve education for all Kagyu monastics in general and for nuns in particular, this gathering will bring nuns from seven different Kagyu nunneries together at Tergar Monastery in Bodhgaya for two weeks of teachings, classes, debate, and special pujas.
The gathering is named for Ārya Kshema, a bhikshuni from the time of the Buddha who was said by the Bhagavan himself to be the greatest of his nuns in terms of wisdom and confidence. Remembering her example will encourage contemporary nuns to pursue their training in education and meditation.
After an opening ceremony on January 20, there will be eight days of teachings, classes, and debates from January 21 to 28. During this period, His Holiness the Gyalwang Karmapa will teach twice daily on Gampopa’s Ornament of Liberation. The nuns will also have daily classes on logic and debate every evening. On January 30, there will be a Special Ritual for the Nuns’ Dharma to Flourish composed by His Holiness the Karmapa. On January 31, there will be a Chöd Ritual “A String of Jewels” to celebrate the special connection women have with the great female master Machik Ladrön. February 1 will feature the rituals of the Sixteen Arhats and Tara, and the Winter Dharma Gathering will close with a closing ceremony on February 2.
The purpose of the Winter Dharma Gathering is to increase awareness and understanding of as well as make progress toward the following:
1. For Buddhism, the fourfold community of bhikshus, bhikshunis, and male and female lay devotees is said to be like the four pillars of a house. It is also said in the context of what constitutes a precious human body that what determines whether or not a land is central is whether all four communities are present. There is no distinction between men and women and no separation between monastic and lay in terms of the responsibility and opportunity to uphold and spread the Dharma, especially in this degenerate age. Thus it is critical that we all join together in striving so that Buddhism may flourish and sentient beings be brought happiness.
2. In order for nuns to uphold the teachings, it is necessary that they have the three trainings in their entirety. It is imperative that they now be able to actually have full ordination in the pratimoksha discipline, able to receive a complete education in Buddhist sciences and philosophy including the Five Great Texts, and able to progress through all the stages of meditational practice and retreat.
During the two weeks in Bodhgaya, it is hoped that the nuns will lay the foundations for fulfilling these goals so that they will be able to return to their nunneries and make further progress for the benefit not just of themselves but of Buddhism and all sentient beings.

Schedule of the Ārya Kshema Winter Dharma Gathering
for Kagyu Nuns
Dates:January 20–February 2, 2014
Location:Tergar Monastery
Debate TopicCollected Topics
ParticipantsNuns from Kagyu Nunneries
Opening CeremonyJanuary 20, 2014
TeachingGampopa’s The Ornament of Liberation
DatesJanuary 21 – 28, 2014
Free DayJanuary 29, 2014
DateJanuary 30, 2014
Ritual:A Special Ritual for the Nuns’ Dharma to Flourish
Date:January 31, 2014
RitualChӧd “A String of Jewels”
Date:February 1, 2014
Ritual:Ritual of the Sixteen Arhats and Tara
Closing Ceremony:February 2, 2014

Announcing the Seventeenth Kagyu Gunchö
 Winter Dharma Teachings & Debates for Kagyu Shedras



The 17th Kagyu Gunchö (Winter Dharma Gathering) will be held at Tergar Monastery in Bodhgaya again from December 3, 2013, to January 1, 2014. During the event, monks from more than ten Kagyu shedras (monastic colleges) will gather for a month of teachings, debate, study, and discussion. The main topics for debate will be the Intermediate Collected Topics (Düdra), the Types of Cognition (Lorik), and Types of Reasons (Takrik). As at the last Kagyu Gunchö, there will be a competition among the different shedras. The finals of the competition will be held on December 28.
During the Gunchö, His Holiness the Gyalwang Karmapa will also continue the transmission and teaching of the Hundred Short Instructions by the Eighth Karmapa Mikyö Dorje, resuming where he left off last year.
A special feature of this year’s program is the introduction of three debates on Madhyamaka philosophy. There will be a debate about XXXX on December 10, about XXXX December 18, and about Shentong on December 27. These debates will be not be held in the traditional Tibetan style but will also incorporate elements from contemporary debating practices.
The Gunchö will close with a four-day conference on Madhyamika from December 29 to January 1. Topics to be discussed will include:
  •  the history of Nagarjuna and Āryadeva and the development of the Madhyamaka philosophy in India;
  •  the spread in Tibet of the Autonomist school of Śāntarakshita and Kamalashila and its eventual eclipse;
  •  the development of the earlier and later Consequentialist traditions in Tibet, beginning from Patsap Lotsawa;
  •  The background and specific features of the Eighth Karmapa Mikyö Dorje’s commentary on the Madhyamakāvatara;
  •  The presentation of the two truths in terms of the three phases in the Karma Kagyu school;
  •  An examination of whether there are any distinctions between the Shentong views professed by Jonang Sherap Gyaltsen and the Third Karmapa Rangjung Dorje;
  •  Similarities and differences between the view and meditation of Mahamudra and that of the Chinese Chan tradition;
  •  Whether Sutra Mahamudra is in taught in the second or third Wheel of Dharma or in any Indian treatises; and
  •  Buddhism in society.
For the monks in Kagyu shedras, the Gunchö has always been a opportunity to deepen their understanding, gain new insights, and make contacts with monks in other monasteries in addition to receiving teachings from great masters such as His Holiness the Karmapa. For many, it is the highlight of the year.
Schedule of the 17th Kagyu Gunchö
December 3, 2013–January 1, 2014
First round:December 3–8
First Madhyamaka debate:December 10
First round (continued):December 11-16
Second Madhyamaka debate:December 20-25
PujaDecember 19
Second round:December 20-25
Third Madhyamaka debate:December 27
FinalsDecember 28
Madhyamaka Conference:December 29 – January 1

2013/08/22

REPAYING THE KINDNESS OF MY MOTHER


by the Third Karmapa Rangjung Dorje 




OM MANI PADME HUM
I prostrate to the Noble Master Chenrezig!

OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH*
There is nothing to be said more profound than this:

Dear mother, you protected me lovingly when I was small
You taught me with love and told me sweet words
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

You fed me from your mouth and wiped my feces away with your hand
You picked me up on your lap again and again -
My kind mother wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

The end of birth is surely death
Even powerful humans don't have the slightest power to remain [forever]
When departing alone, [only] the sacred dharma will [be of] benefit -
[My kind mothers] wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

The end of collecting is surely loss
Even the greediest person will be unable to take anything along
When departing alone, only the sacred dharma will [be of] benefit -
[My kind mothers] wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

Mother, when you are going to depart alone from here
I pray that you, I, and Chenrezig will meet!
My kind mother wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

I pay homage to lama and protector Manjushri!
Wherever in the three realms the six kinds of beings are born,
their birth is of four kinds:
Except for miraculous birth, a body is formed in dependence on
a father and a mother.
Due to karmic forces, you conceived and carried me for nine months
and ten days -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When the life force impelled my embryo to come out
You suffered the bone-wracking pain of contractions -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When I was born your body became covered with blood, lymph, pus,
and milk -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When my skin and bones were feeble and not fully formed
You picked me up with gentle hands -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When I had pus in my eyes or other organs
You licked it off with your soft tongue -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

Even when my specks of feces came into your mouth
You were not disgusted -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

You always held me tight, like in the gentle warmth of your belly -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When sleep rendered us unconscious at night
I would interrupt your sleep many times -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

You took me on your lap and cuddled me -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

You cheered me up and made me so happy -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

Whenever I was wriggling and crying, you tirelessly gave me your
breast to suck -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When my eyes were tightly closed by sleep
You swiftly protected me from heat and cold -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When I crawled on all fours like an animal
You taught me how to walk on my feet -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When I was three years old
You kept an eye on me wherever I went -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When I was five years old
You showed me how to dress myself properly -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

When I was ten years old
You taught me how to understand and decide things -
My kind mothers wandering in the three samsaric realms, oh no!
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

Your mind was one-pointedly focused [on my welfare] -
My kind mothers wandering in the three pitiful samsaric realms
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

[Throughout,] you were always calm and fair -
My kind mothers wandering in the three pitiful samsaric realms
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

You gave your permission when it was time for me to leave -
My kind mothers wandering in the three pitiful samsaric realms
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

[Because of your love] I became independent after I had left you -
My kind mothers wandering in the three pitiful samsaric realms
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

If sudden disasters were to carry you off -
My kind mothers wandering in the three pitiful samsaric realms
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

And you would end up in some unknown place -
My kind mothers wandering in the three pitiful samsaric realms
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

May our minds become ultimately inseparable -
My kind mothers wandering in the three pitiful samsaric realms
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

Dear mother, do not be angry when I say this:
My thoughts go to you again and again
And your kind acts make me weep -
My kind mothers wandering in the three pitiful samsaric realms
May I guide you on Chenrezig's path. OM MANI PADME HUM HRIH

Mother, when it is time for your mind to leave this body
May you be born in a supremely blissful state and
Having been born there, may you attain the heart of enlightenment
Having attained that, may you act for the benefit of all beings

Words of vast and deep meaning break my heart.
Vajradhara in the pure realm of Akanishta,
And Pema Jungne in Ngayab Ling,
Please let the ability to repay the kindness of my mothers
Awaken in me, Palden Karmapa of the Snowy Regions.
___________________________________________________________

Distinguished Karma Kagyu Lama, Ato Rinpoche, distributed this text.
Thanks to P. Hayward who typed this version and made it available electronically. 

*HRIH is the heart's seed syllable encapsulating the compassionate activity of the bodhisattva.

mother: This very moving prayer of thanks is not only addressed to the woman who gave birth to us in this lifetime, nor is it addressed to the woman or women who, though they did not bear us, may have parented us.  Also, it is not exclusively about human mothers, for in the context of samsara we have had many former existences and so, many different kinds of mothers.  Without all of these mothers, we would not now have the opportunity of practicing Buddha-dharma.

2013/08/19

The 17th Karmapa Almost Looks Like the 16th Karmapa !








 

































Divinity of being simple ( The Week )

Born to lead: The Karmapa knew his destiny at seven.
By eight, he was in a monastery in Tibet receiving education.
All in a day’s work: the Karmapa at a store selling Buddhist literature and artefacts.
Karmapa Interacting with his followers.
Karmapa Pursuing his hobby-Painting.

The bowl of Ferrero Rocher chocolates, their crinkled dull gold foil gleaming like many mini suns, is hurriedly cleared away. Two tape recorders are placed on the edge of the glass. “It could turn into a Dharma talk,'' says a nun as she settles on the floor. The 17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, walks in a minute later and sits down, his red slippers hitting the floor. “I am very tired,'' he says with a smile. “I have no energy.” His translator, a man with more salt than pepper in his curly hair, sits beside him on the floor. The monks in the room follow suit.