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Showing posts from June, 2012

Dwells without Thought-Coverings

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KARMAPA'S SCHEDULE 23RD JUNE - 22ND JULY, 2012

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4TH KHORYUG CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FOR TIBETAN BUDDHIST

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5th - 9th June -Norbulingka Institute, Dharamsala
day two
Day Two began with a science tutorial by Dekila Chungyalpa, the conference facilitator, for the gathered monks and nuns on different biological cycles such as the carbon cycle, the nitrogen cycle, and the water cycle. In such a complex system, the depletion or over-production of one element could lead to imbalances which compromised the survival of other parts of the system. When whole earth systems such as the water cycle or the nitrogen cycle are disrupted, the consequences for ecosystems and biodiversity were immense, she said. This underscored the importance for seeing the world as one system and recognizing our own ability to affect each other at different ends of the planet. Bringing the environmental concern to a local level, the second presentation was delivered by Jigme Norbu from the Environment and Development Desk of DIIR, and covered the environmental threats currently facing the Tibetan Plateau, driven by both cl…

4TH KHORYUG CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FOR TIBETAN BUDDHIST MONASTERIES, NUNNERIES AND DHARMA CENTRES

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- BIODIVERSITY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS 5th - 9th June -Norbulingka Institute, Dharamsala
FIRST HAND ACCOUNT
Given the focus of this year's conference, it seemed appropriate that, as the delegates gathered in the grounds of the Norbulingka Institute to await the arrival of His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, the temperature was climbing steadily to 42 degrees. This year, Dharamsala has experienced both unusually severe winter conditions, with snow filling the Kangra Valley for the first time in fifty years, and unusually high summer temperatures. It is a reminder to everyone present that we are now living with climate change impacts.


Celebrating World Environment Day, His Holiness the 17th Karmapa and the Honorable Speaker of the Tibetan Parliament launched the 4th Khoryug Conference on Environmental Protection for Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries, which will focus on Biodiversity, Climate Change and Natural Disaster Preparedness. The aims of the conference are to …

CELEBRATING WORLD ENVIRONMENT DAY

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5th June - Dharamsala, Norbulingkha Celebrating World Environment Day, His Holiness the 17th Karmapa and the Honorable Speaker of the Tibetan Parliament launched the 4th Khoryug Conference on Environmental Protection for Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries. The five-day conference will focus on biodiversity, climate change, and natural disaster preparedness, and is attended by over sixty representatives from forty-five monasteries from across the Himalayas and South Asia. The goals of the conference are to provide environmental education on biodiversity and climate change, and to train the monastic representatives to learn climate adaptation strategies and to develop disaster preparedness plans for their monasteries. The conference is organized by Rangjung Khoryug Sungkyob Tsokpa, an association of Buddhist monasteries working to protect the environment of the Himalayas and South Asia, which is chaired by His Holiness the 17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje. Parnter NGOs such as the Centre of…

May You Embrace the Globe

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Just as trees grow and reach high,
Lifting their young branches up,
Thus may you embrace the globe,
This turquoise-colored world.

~ The 17th Karmapa


http://justdharmaquotes.wordpress.com/2012/06/19/may-you-embrace-the-globe/

Early Karmapa with Footprints

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This votive painting belongs to the Karma Kagyu School, judging by the special black hat that its main figure wears. It exemplifies the simplest and probably earliest-known painting of a founding master of that school, or Karmapa. It pays homage to the black-hatted master shown above the footprints, who is presumably the First Karmapa, Dusum Khyenpa (1110–1193).

The painting was simply executed with thin washes of color on silk, so it lacks most of the expected features of a fully colored painting. Still it exemplifies devotional paintings of the late twelfth century, based again on worship of the lama’s footprints.

The painting also pays respect to the master by depicting him under a broad parasol and surrounded by auspicious objects placed within the undulating vine that grows from below. The parasol is an ancient Indian Buddhist iconographic element of depictions of the Buddha and a way of auspiciously paying homage.



http://education.rma2.org/mirror-of-the-buddha-resource…